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 Millénaire de la cathédrale de Strasbourg
 

Many thanks!

The celebration of the Millennium of the foundations of the cathedral of Strasbourg , which began September 2014 , ended on September 2015.
One whole year of festivities completely devoted to the Cathedral !

During this year, you had the opportunity to discover exhibits, attend many concerts , conferences and exchange during debates - meetings. But, this summer, you have mostly been more than 1.2 million spectators, to marvel at the great show "1015-2015 : the Cathedral of eternity" This success demonstrates your deep attachment to Strasbourg Cathedral and furthermore your interest in the rich historic and cultural heritage of our city.

Thank you to our institutional partners, sponsors, to the associative, cultural and educational contributors. Thank you to all the many visitors. Thank you to the inhabitants of Strasbourg. Thank you all for contributing to the success of this Millenium.

Now, to follow the news of the Cathedral, we invite you to visit the website of the Fondation de l’Œuvre Notre-Dame

 

All video clips


The latest video

Lightshow at the cathedral - summer 2015

03/12/2015

 

The construction of the cathedral

 

1015-1048

1015 to 1048: From the laying of the first stone to the Ottonian basilica

Bishop Werner begins building a new cathedral.

The start date of the cathedral's construction in 1015 is recorded in an old chronicle dating from the 12th century.

The new building was probably erected on the ruins of the previous major church. Its scale was spectacular for the time. When it was completed, Strasbourg Cathedral was one of the largest churches in the Empire.

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1048-1180

1048 to 1180: From the basilica to the Romanesque cathedral

During the 12th century, a number of fires damaged the monument. These resulted in restorations which largely retained the former design.

The fire of 1176 was doubtless the source of major work on the site. The prudent repairs of the past which sought to respect the design of the former church were abandoned in favour of a full-scale reconstruction project.

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1180-1230

1180 to 1230: From the Romanesque cathedral to the Gothic cathedral

From 1180, an ambitious project involving the reconstruction and modernisation of the eastern part of the cathedral was launched while retaining the former foundations. Stone vaults replaced the former beamed ceiling.

Around 1225 the Gothic style was adopted at the cathedral.

In the early 13th century, the Fondation de l'Œuvre Notre-Dame was created to manage the finances and organisation of the work site.

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1230-1275

1230 to 1275: Construction of the nave

The former Romanesque nave was replaced by a new nave in the pure Gothic style in just 45 years.

With the choir of Cologne Cathedral, under construction from 1248, the nave in Strasbourg was the largest Gothic structure in the Holy Roman Empire in the mid-13th century.

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1275-1340

1275 to 1340: Construction of the eastern section and of the southern tower

Construction of the cathedral's eastern section, a genuine masterpiece of Gothic architecture, began in 1276. Its construction is associated with the project manager Erwin.

The double curtain wall facade was truly innovative. The cathedral project became a major hotbed for creativity.

In the middle of the first floor the great rose window was created, which was one of the largest in Europe with a diameter of 13.60 m.

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1340-1360

1340 to 1360: Construction of the Chapel of Sainte-Catherine

Ordered by the cathedral's bishop in 1331, the Chapel of Sainte Catherine was built between 1340 and 1349.

The first astronomical clock, dedicated to the Three Kings, was installed in 1352 on the western wall of transept’s southern arm.

The cathedral was damaged in an earthquake in 1356.

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1360-1399

1360 to 1399: Construction of the north tower and of the belfry

The grandson of the architect Erwin continued the work on the facade’s third level. He built the north tower up to the floor situated above the great rose window.

A change of project occurred after 1365 with the aim of increasing the cathedral's height.

Maître Gerlach drew up plans for a belfry to fill in the space between the two towers. The smaller belfry built after his death in 1371 did not match his design

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1399-1419

1399 to 1419: Construction of the high tower

In 1399, the architect Ulrich Ensingen designed an octagonal high tower surrounded by four stairway turrets topped by a small floor and an openwork spire featuring a slightly curved design.

The goal was to build the highest tower reaching above the heights of the other churches of the Holy Roman Empire such as Freiburg, Ulm, Vienna and Regensburg.

Ulrich Ensingen built the octagon up to the middle of the small floor, in less than 27 years, until his death in 1419.

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1419-1439

1419 to 1439: Completion of the spire

As the project manager from 1419 onwards, Johannes Hültz of Cologne took over from Ulrich Ensinger and built the cathedral's spire. This was an innovative and outstanding structure. Entirely openwork, it stood in stark contrast to the classical projects of the day.

When the spire was completed in 1439, the cathedral was the highest Christian monument ever built at a height of 142 m. Its contemporaries referred to it as the "eighth wonder of the world".

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Earlier
1015-1048
1048-1180
1180-1230
1230-1275
1275-1340
1340-1360
1360-1399
1399-1419
1419-1439
Later
 

View the details on the Fondation de l'Œuvre Notre-Dame website



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